Image from page 6 of “St. Louis Argus: May 19, 1916” (1916)

A few nice movies in theaters images I found:

Image from page 6 of “St. Louis Argus: May 19, 1916” (1916)
movies in theaters
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Identifier: St.LouisArgusMay191916Vol.VNo.6
Title: St. Louis Argus: May 19, 1916
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: progressive era 1916 segregation anti-segregation racism poro college annie malone charles turpin pullman porter g. h. crawford Lawrence greene submarine booker washington theater waco st. louis giants cuban stars baseball negro league federal park webster groves elmwood park kinloch east st. louis african american journalism movies
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!*rr.>r ^.^r**?^^ THE ST. LOUIS ARGUS Page 7

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TEXT—M ■■id lb* kloc to inal tieOltUU, wbarefor* sosst Uiou also with usi-ii au*. a.a. To iet the settinf of this text wemost read at least th* Ant 23 tithiat lha chapter inwhich It la found. It will be seenthat Kin*- Davidwaa driven fromhie place by the rebellion under toBWOlONAL swrsoiooL Lesson (By B. O. flllXERa. AcllDf Wrsctor ofBuntor School Coura* of the WoodyBlbl* Inatltnt*. Chlcaso.) (Copvtlibl, 1111, Vhiui Minumpv Inlon.) LESSON FOR MAY 21 THE CRIPPLE OF LYSTRA. a dark Item InDavids hiatorj,and hla prospect* for Anal vlclorr were not very promlslnr. Someof nil moat influ-entlal friend*were turn lot fromhim. and hla pop- Ittal* Choice of David.In the Dm place It HI a properchoice, lor otod tboufb David wu driven out, ho leaa atlll the rightfulklni. Then Bialn. It waa a, very en-thusiast 1c choice, aa we tee Cram versa■ Si. Ittal wu In It for life or death.And It waa a deliberate choice. Hswaa aware of the difficulties, the prl-ratlona and the danger* ho muit sharewith

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Image from page 374 of “The literary digest” (1890)
movies in theaters
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Identifier: literarydigest60newy
Title: The literary digest
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: New York : Funk & Wagnalls [etc.]
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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Ivz^fVr A CAMEL GOT HIS HEAD IN, AND THEN- —Pease in the Newark News. people who are in the liquor business at present are getting outof it and going into the movies instead—a situation whichgains piquancy from his further statement that the motion-picture has been the great foe of the saloon. The same paperquotes another manager as follows: I. The Literary Digest for February 1, 1919 rs The motion-picture theater is the only rival to the saloon as acheap place of entertainment. It is the only place where a mancan be amused for a long time at the same price that he paysfor drinks—or less. That is what has made the motion-picturetheater the great rival to the saloon everywhere, and that is why.

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Copyrighted by the Press Publishing Company. FREED FROM THE DEMON RUM. —Cassel in the New York Evening World. with the closing of the saloons, we look for a great increase inthe motion-picture business. Men will seek amusement, andthe motion-picture theater will be the natural place to seek it. In many quarters there seems to be a doubt whether theProhibition Amendment, so triumphantly ratified, can be suc-cessfully enforced. The fact might as well be faced at the out-set that this amendment and the prospective laws relating to itcan be evaded and broken easily enough in innumerable ways,remarks the Manchester, N.H., Union, which goes on to say: It is all right to celebrate the ratification, for this is a genuineachievement. But it doesnt mark the end of the struggle—not by a long shot. And after the bell-ringing, and the passingof the intervening time, and the enacting of all the laws thatcan be put on the statute-books, we must still be prepared tocombat this evil in its most ev

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Image from page 375 of “Moving Picture Age (1920)” (1920)
movies in theaters
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Identifier: movingpictureage03unse
Title: Moving Picture Age (1920)
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: motion pictures
Publisher: Class Publications, inc.
Contributing Library: Library of Congress, MBRS, Moving Image Section
Digitizing Sponsor: Library of Congress, Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division

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e Municipal Reference Library of New YorkCity. This is the fourth of a series on civic subjects inauguratedtwo years ago, and will serve as a supplement to the special reportNo. 2, Teaching Citizenship via the Movies. Atlas Educational Company Moves Into New OflSces Owing to the growing clientele and need for expansion, theAtlas Educational Film Company, creator of the Atlas Educa-tional Weekly, has recently taken over the Playhouse on Southboulevard, just west of Wisconsin street, Oak Park, 111. Thebuilding has been remodelled and the company is now using itfor its main office, studio and laboratory. This building is justa nucleus of the one proposed, the company having adjacent lotsunder option. I. R. Rehm, president of the company, and C. A.Rehm, secretary, both old residents of Oak Park, founded theAtlas Educational Weekly for moving picture theaters, schools,colleges and churches, the enterprise being a development oftheir school business. The Weekly is now being released through

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29 centers and each release, the company states, is shown to ap-proximately 8,000,000 persons a year. The company insists oncorrect historical and biographical atmosphere and employs com-petent scientists for an extensive research. Its directors andcamera men travel in all parts of the country as well as in for-eign parts on their missions. In addition to the Oak Park headquarters, the company willuse studios elsewhere in the country as occasion may require. Itwill continue to maintain a sales office in Chicago. W. M. Graham, director of the film exchange, will look afterall details pertaining to the exchange work, including the rentalof educational and religious subjects. Mr. Graham was formerlyan instructor in the manual training department of the Oak Parkhigh school and is a member of its moving picture committee. Please say, As advertised in MOVING PICTURE AGE! when you write to advertisers. Ausust. 1920 MOVING PICTURE AGE 29 Using the Screen to Get Your Messasre Across When the p

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