Image from page 915 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)

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Image from page 915 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
theater
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp03balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
m Broad Street, City Hall and the theatres by direct and comfortable trolley route. ^ A quiet, cozy hotel where every patron is a guest in fact as well as in name. ^ The Rittenhouse Cafe is noted for its unsurpassed cuisine and service, being supplied daily with fresh products—poultry, eggs and milk—from its own farms in Chester County. ^ The Grill and Cafe make a special feature of Club breakfasts, Club lunches and table dhote dinners at reasonable prices. The Rittenhouse Orchestra furnishes delightful music during luncheon and in the evenings. ^ One of the Baltimore and Ohio officials, who has stopped at practically every prominent hotel in this country and Europe, recently told us that he never enjoyed his hotel visits quite so much as here. Rooms .50 up —With bath .00 up The Rittenhouse in PhiladelphiaOn the Edge of Everywhere CHARLES DUFFY, Manager THE LAlE CAKV L. HOLMES Please mention our magazine xchen wriliny adrcrlisera. 108 THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE

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GEORGE ROBINSON, SWITCH TENDER, NEWARK. OHIO In this picture he is seen Iming up the switches for No. 103 to enter C. & N. Division for Columbus and Cincinnati. Mr. Robinson has performed this duty for many years in a most efficient manner Rotating Members T. F. MuLQuiNN Conductor, Newark, O. A. Brant Engineer, Newark, O. S. B. SinrrH Switch Tender, Newark, Q. R, McLellen Fireman, Newark, O. J. E. Horn Chief Car Inspector, Newark, O. J. P, Floyd Machinist, Newark, O. Gary L. Holmes, who died of apoplexy at8.30 a. m. on October 9, while at work northof Mansfield, was born at St. Louisville, Ohio,November 13, 1878. He was educated in the schools of thatvillage and in April, 1902, entered the employof the Baltimore and Ohio as carpenter helper,was.rapidly promoted to carpenter and then tocarpenter foreman, reaching the latter positionin 1905. All his mature, producing years were spentin the service of the Company, of which he wasa loyal and valuable employe. On that part of the road

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Image from page 206 of “Players and plays of the last quarter century; an historical summary of causes and a critical review of conditions as existing in the American theatre at the close of the nineteenth century” (1903)
theater
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Identifier: playersplaysofla02strauoft
Title: Players and plays of the last quarter century; an historical summary of causes and a critical review of conditions as existing in the American theatre at the close of the nineteenth century
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Strang, Lewis Clinton, 1869-1935
Subjects: Theater — History Theater — United States Acting and actors
Publisher: Boston, L.C. Page
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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in 1893. Mr. Grundy, Jr., from the French, pro-duced in 1894. His Grace de Grammont, produced byOtis Skinner in 1894. 170 Players and Plays April Weather, produced by Sol SmithRussell. Mistress Betty, produced by Modjeska in 1895- Gossip, adaptation done in collaboration with Leo Ditrichstein, and produced in 1895. Bohemia, from the French La Vie deBoheme, by Henri Murger and TheodoreBarriere, produced in 1896. The Liar, from the French of Bisson,produced in 1896. Nathan Hale, produced by Nat C. Good-win and Maxine Elliott in 1898. The Moth and the Flame, rewritten froman earlier play called The Harvest, andproduced in 1898, afterward used as a star-ring vehicle by Efifie Shannon and HerbertKelcey. The Head of the Family, from the Ger-man, produced by William H. Crane in 1898. The Cowboy and the Lady, produced byNat C. Goodwin and Maxine Elliott in 1899. Barbara Frietchie, produced by JuliaMarlowe in 1899. Sapho, from the novel of Alphonse Dau-det, produced by Olga Nethersole in 1900.

Text Appearing After Image:
ETHEL BARRVMOREAs Madame Trentoni in Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines Four American Dramatists 171 Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines, pro-duced by Ethel Barrymore in 1901. The Gimbers, produced by Amelia Bing-ham in 1901. Lovers Lane, produced in 1901. The Marriage Game, adapted from theFrench, produced by Sadie Martinot in1901. The Way of the World, produced by ElsieDe Wolfe in 1901. The Last of the Dandies, produced byBeerbohm Tree in 1901. The Girl and the Judge, produced byAnnie Russell in 1901. The best of these recent plays and a veryfair example of Mr. Fitchs capabilities was The Climbers, the merits of which fairlybalanced its obvious and rather exasperatingblemishes. In accordance with his custom,Mr. Fitch started out very well; and byintroducing his leading women charactersimmediately on their return from the funeralof the husband of one of them and the fatherof several others, the dramatist secured thenovel, even startling, and to some, possibly,shocking effect, that he

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General view of part of the South Water street Illinois Central Railroad freight terminal, Chicago, Ill. (LOC)
theater
Image by The Library of Congress
Delano, Jack,, photographer.

General view of part of the South Water street Illinois Central Railroad freight terminal, Chicago, Ill.

1943 April

1 transparency : color.

Notes:
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
Illinois Central Railroad
World War, 1939-1945
Railroad stations
Railroad freight cars
Office buildings
United States–Illinois–Chicago

Format: Transparencies–Color

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Collection 12002-11 (DLC) 93845501

General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a34780
hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3j00096

Call Number: LC-USW36-598

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