Worker at carbon black plant, Sunray, Texas (LOC)

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Worker at carbon black plant, Sunray, Texas (LOC)
films
Image by The Library of Congress
Vachon, John,, 1914-1975,, photographer.

Worker at carbon black plant, Sunray, Texas

1942

1 transparency : color.

Notes:
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
World War, 1939-1945
Industry
United States–Texas–Sunray

Format: Transparencies–Color

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Collection 12002-59 (DLC) 93845501

General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a35446

Call Number: LC-USW36-842

Image from page 488 of “Practical physics” (1922)
films
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: practicalphysics00mill
Title: Practical physics
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Millikan, Robert Andrews Gale, Henry Gordon
Subjects: Physics
Publisher: Boston : Ginn and Co.
Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library
Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
Cinematograph Film of a Bdllet fired through a Soap Bubble The flight of the missile may be followed easily. It will be seen that the bubble breaks, not when the bullet enters, but when it emerges. (From Moving Pictures, by F. A. Talbot. Courtesy of J. B. Lippincott Company)

Text Appearing After Image:
ELECTRICAL EADIATIONS 425 condenser C^ is brought into use, the loading coil not being utilized.^The oscillations in the aerial circuit of the receiving station induceexactly similar ones in the detector circuit, which is tuned to resonancewith the receiving aerial by means of L^, B„, and Cg. The so-calleddetector of these oscillations may be simply a crystal of galena D inseries with the telephone receivers R. This crystal, like the tungarrectifier of § 374, has the property of transmitting a current in onedirection only.- Were it not for this property the telephone could notbe used as a detector, because its diaphragm cannot vibrate with a fre-quency of the order of a million; and even if it could, it would producesound waves far above the limit ofhearing. Because of this rectifyingproperty of the crystal the receiverdiaphragm is drawn in only oncewhile the oscillations produced by agiven wave train last, this effect beingdue to the rectified pulsating currentwhich passes in one

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 445 of “Practical physics” (1922)
films
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: practicalphysics00mill
Title: Practical physics
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Millikan, Robert Andrews Gale, Henry Gordon
Subjects: Physics
Publisher: Boston : Ginn and Co.
Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library
Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
light appearsdrawn into a luminous arc. This phenomenon is due to the fact that we continueto see an object for a small fraction of a second after the image of it disappearsfrom the retina. The period of time varies somewhat with different individuals.The so-called moving pictures do not move at all. In normal projection16 brilliant stationary pictures per second appear in succession upon the screen,and during the interval between the pictures the screen is perfectly dark. It isduring this period of darkness that the film is jerked forward to get the nextpicture into position for projection. The eye, however, detects no jieriod of dark-ness, for on account of persistence of vision it continues to see the stationarypicture not only during this period of darkness but dimly for an instant evenafter the next picture appears upon the screen. This causes the successive station-ary pictures, which differ but slightly, to blend smoothly into each other and thusgive the effect of actual motion

Text Appearing After Image:
Photographs of Sound Waves having their Origin in an ElectricSpark behind the Middle of the Black Disk 1. A spherical sound wave. 2. The same wave .00007 second later. 3. A wave re-flected from a plane surface, curvature unchanged. 4. A wave reflected from aconvex surface, curvature increased. 5. The source at the focusof a SO, lens. Thephotograph shows first, the original wave on the right; second, the reflected wave,with its increased curvature ; and third, the transmitted plane wave. 6. Source atfocus of a concave mirror; the reflected wave is plane. (Taken hy Professor A. L,Foley and Wilmer H. Souder, of the University of Indiana) IMAGES IN MIRRORS 387 its image is just behind it, out to an infinite distance, its imagemoves back only to the focal plane through F. Hence theimage must lie somewhere between F and the mirror. Theimage PQ of an object PQ is always diminished, because itlies between the converging lines PC and QC. It can belocated by the ray method (Fig. 419) exactly as

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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